CogniTrade Review – Confirmed Scam Software! Avoid It!

CogniTrade Review – Confirmed Scam Software! Avoid It!

Today, we review the CogniTrade software which seemed genuine to us only for the first two frames of the pitch video. The initial few scenes feature two IBM senior management employees leading IBM’s work on cognitive computing and research and development of core technologies for Watson. For just a while we thought we are watching some serious stuff, but not to be. The very next moment, the same old blabber asking you to try this revolutionary software pursues. In this review, we are going to discuss more on the CogniTrade software and why you should not believe what you see in the video.

How promising is the CogniTrade software?

We are introduced to the CogniTrade software by its CEO Cameron Doyle. Mr. Doyle was associated with IBM till some five years ago and worked as a system analyst there. He got in touch with a team there which was utilizing this technology and got to learn it and know that it is the future of all automated technologies. The software uses state of the art computing and databases greater than an Exabyte, we are told. We know that this is false since, for a company like Facebook, the size of its database is not more than half an Exabyte!

The CogniTrade software can allegedly make over $1,000 for its users consistently day in and day out for a lifetime. The average profits earned by the first twenty users were around $1,530 for the day. The CogniTrade software processes around 142 trades per day and allegedly has a winning rate of over 95.2%. Each one of the users of this software stands to earn $256K per year! The software earns a pie out of the near $5.3 trillion that are traded daily in the world markets, we are told.

What the use of cognitive computing technology as Mr. Doyle tells us is already known to the big players at the Wall Street who use it and make huge profits. But, this secret tech is kept confined to closed rooms and out of the reach of small time investors and traders. One reason that has been shared with us is that if it becomes too common, it could cause a collapse of the world economy.

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Twenty spots for Grab!

To prevent the world economy to implode if the use of cognitive computing becomes too prevalent, our savior Mr. Doyle is restricting the giving away of his software to just 20 more ‘everyday’ people. Imagine the situation when every other person would be making millions as Mr. Doyle allegedly made in his three years. He tells us how he admitted another 20 people just the day before and how each one of them has already earned the promised amount as profits.

Why is it Free?

The CogniTrade software is being given away for ‘Free’ but just for the twenty few people. The accounts of these lucky ones would be funded by Mr. Doyle’s ‘personal team of brokers’. The only condition to it is that at the end of every month the broker would make a ‘cut’ in your profits. We also learn that the software is available for free just ‘today’ and from ‘tomorrow’ it is going to go public with a setup price of $979 plus $49 monthly on Kickstarter.com. We are also told that while the users make profits, Mr. Doyle also gets a commission of 1% on it, so it’s a win-win situation for all.

The CogniTrade System is a SCAM!

As phony and wicked the scammers are the more genuine and ‘real’ they pretend to be. As if other things that they used to do were not enough, they have also started using the name and goodwill of big companies of IBM for their selfish interests.

Mr. Doyle knows “exactly what we are going through, exactly what we feel and exactly how to make money,” but the problem is that we have come to know ‘exactly’ what he is up to. The person is an actor and not a CEO of any company or an ex-employee of IBM. He shamelessly states that the thing which is keeping us from making money is ‘misinformation’ .What an irony that the scammers are spreading misinformation themselves. Mr. Doyle is nowhere to be found on social networking sites or any financial news websites either. The scammers just keep on coming up with popular names and surnames, like Doyle on the lines of Sir. Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes.

The profits that the software allegedly claims to make are ridiculously untrue. Look at the winning rate that the scammers- 95.2%! Have you ever seen or achieved a winning rate that high? The screenshots of profits that are shown in the entire video are fake and morphed.

CogniTrade – A copy of old scams

We know exactly who the scammers behind this system are. If you frequent our site and like to keep yourself updated, you must have come across our reviews of the Hexa Trader or Leaked Profits Software. The CogniTrade is just a recurrence of these older scams. The same syndicate of scammers is behind all these scams. The scammers use many illustrations repeatedly making our task of reviewing and investigation fairly simple. Even the African guy we see in the video is a common ‘testifier’ whom we can easily identify. He is just an actor available for his services in return for money.

Illegal use of IBM’s name!

The CogniTrade software allegedly works on the innovative and upcoming cognitive computing technology. IBM which is leading the world IT in this field has been mentioned a couple of times in the video. This has been the first time when we have witnessed the name of a real company and its employees in a pitch video. The scammers have really got high on their boldness. We are sure this video will pave the way for many such scam videos employing the names of real-world companies and famous people. Such videos would play the interviews or clips such that they would seem to be references or testimonials for the success of the software. While they would actually be entirely out of context with the software. We hope IBM takes note of it and comes out openly to debunk any claims of their role in the creation of the CogniTrade software.

Conclusion

The CogniTrade software is a dangerous scam and we recommend that you do not fall for the ‘Free’ tag on it or the false promise of making hundreds of thousands of dollars year after year. The scammers have crossed their territories and have started naming well-known companies in their videos to lend credibility. You should not let this trend flourish, and we want you to ignore this scam software.

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